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English Grammar English Grammar 101
Q uotation Marks: Ellipsis Points and Brackets
 
Lesson 5-27
Prompt:Ellipsis points of three periods (...) signal the omission of words in a direct quotation. A fourth period (question mark or exclamation point) marks the end of the sentence: He announced, "I will win the election ...." Within quotations or parenthetical statements use brackets to insert remarks, additions, or corrections: The witness stated, "I saw him [John Doe] run down the street." Using the convention [sic] within a quotation indicates a misspelled or misused word or other error. This shows the reader that the quotation was exact: "This is to [sic] difficult," he said. The word should be spelled "too."
Directions:Quotation marks, ellipsis points, and brackets (if necessary) have been correctly used in only one of the following paired sentences. Click to select the letter of the correct sentence (A or B) for each of the following paired sentences.
1.

( A ) Wasn't it General Harry Lee who memorialized George Washington as "...first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen"?

( B ) Wasn't it General Harry Lee who memorialized George Washington as [first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen]?

2.

( A ) The phrase, I regret [that] I have but one life to give for my country, is attributed to the American patriot Nathan Hale.

( B ) The phrase, "I regret [that] I have but one life to give for my country," is attributed to the American patriot Nathan Hale.

3.

( A ) The American Declaration of Independence begins, [When in the course of human events,...].

( B ) The American Declaration of independence begins, "When in the course of human events...."

4.

( A ) In Patric Henry's famous speech he states, "...Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!"

( B ) In Patric Henry's famous speech he states, "Forbid it, Almighty God! ....I know not what course others may take, but [as for me,] give me liberty or give me death!"[sic]

5.

( A ) In a letter to Martha, George Washington wrote, "[ It has been determined in congress, that the whole army raised for the defence [sic] of the american [sic] cause shall be put under my care, and that it is necessary for me to proceed to boston [sic] to take upon me the command of it.]"

( B ) In a letter to Martha, George Washington wrote, "It has been determined in congress, that the whole army raised for the defence [sic] of the american [sic] cause shall be put under my care, and that it is necessary for me to proceed to boston [sic] to take upon me the command of it."

6.

( A ) "These are the times that try men's souls," is the opening sentence of John Paine's pamphlet of 1776.

( B ) "[These are the times that try men's souls]" is the opening sentence of John Paine's pamphlet of 1776.

7.

( A ) Thomas Jefferson penned this famous phrase in our Declaration of Independence: ["We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, [sic] that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."]

( B ) Thomas Jefferson penned this famous phrase in our Declaration of Independence: "We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, [sic] that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."

8.

( A ) "...For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments..." was one of the reasons for our Declaration.

( B ) "...For taking away our [Charters,] abolishing our most valuable [Laws] and altering fundamentally the [Forms] of our [Governments]..."was one of the reasons for our Declaration.

9.

( A ) The American Declaration of Independence concludes with this phrase, [...That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from Allegiance to the British Crown,]...

( B ) The American Declaration of Independence concludes with this phrase, "...That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States, and they are Absolved from Allegiance to the British Crown...."

10.

( A ) Thomas Paine reflected, "Whether the independence of the continent was declared too soon, or delayed too long, I will not now enter...an argument...."

( B ) Thomas Paine reflected, ["Whether the independence of the continent was declared too soon, or delayed too long, I will not now enter...an argument..."]