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English Grammar English Grammar 101
I ndependent versus Dependent Clauses
 
Lesson 2-13
Prompt:When a clause stands alone as a complete thought, the clause is an "independent clause." When a clause cannot stand alone as a complete thought, the clause is a "dependent clause."
Example:Consider the following: 1) "The spring flowers are beginning to grow ..." This clause stands alone and is an independent clause. 2) "When the sun came up ..." This clause cannot stand alone and is a dependent clause.
Directions:Below are groups of words, phrases, and clauses. Below each group, click to select whether the group is an independent clause, dependent clause, or no clause.
1.The horses were running in the field ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
2.Near the city of Chicago ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
3.As the crowd slowly gathered ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
4.While he was at work ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
5.The spring floods were beginning ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
6.An independent clause makes a complete thought ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
7.When a dependent clause is used ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
8.A clause has a simple subject and a simple predicate ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
9.Next to his sister on the boat ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
10.The words "in the house" are a prepositional phrase ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)
11.A phrase is not a clause ...
(independent clause) (dependent clause) (no clause)